?

Log in

< back | 0 - 10 |  
insolentscrawl [userpic]
Friday - Post a Story
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at November 7th, 2008 (09:08 pm)
Tags:

It's Friday again! Want a concrit? Need a concrit? Link your story to this entry, and we'll see what we can do!

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Wednesday and Thursday
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at November 6th, 2008 (08:15 am)

Ack! I'm late again.  Darn RL keeps whacking me on the head.

You see... the sickness has invaded once again.  Four sick kids (yep, count 'em - all four are sick), and sick myself.  There's nothing more heartwrenching than having a five year old cry herself to sleep on your lap - every hour or two.

Enough of that.

With NaNoWriMo in full swing, I'm going to ask everyone to share just a brief (couple sentence) glimpse of what they're working on.  As for the question of the week, it'll be very easy.  If you're working on NaNo this year, what obstacles have you found are preventing you from writing?

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Tuesday - Grammar Lesson
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at November 3rd, 2008 (11:17 pm)
Tags:

I wanted to let everyone know that this particular post is going to be delayed as I do a little research on passive versus active voice.

Keep in mind, I'm always looking for grammar topics to cover, so make your suggestions. Next week, we'll be covering the difference between affect and effect, because I'm too much of an idiot to know there even is a difference half the time. :)

seattlecsifan [userpic]
Monday - Prompts Day
by seattlecsifan (seattlecsifan)
at November 3rd, 2008 (09:04 am)


Hey there, its time for this week's prompts.

Quote: use "You are joking aren't you? Please tell me you're joking."

Word: use Maps.

Use either or both and lets have some fun.

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Friday - Need a Concrit?
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 31st, 2008 (01:23 pm)
Tags:

It's Friday again. If you'd like a concrit for a story, just hit reply and provide a link. We'll happily look through it. Or, for those who like to edit, go ahead and concrit any linked stories!

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Thursday - Question Day
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 30th, 2008 (01:02 am)
Tags:

Well, it's Thursday again.

I've been slaving away at my story prep for NaNoWriMo this year.  As the date approached, the more excited I get.  Even if I don't make the 50k, it's going to be a lot of fun.

My question for this week kind of links into this...

What makes writing fun for you?

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Wednesday - What is Everyone Working On?
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 28th, 2008 (11:07 pm)
Tags:

So, after writing my outline for NaNo, I ended up tossing the whole thing, because it really didn't fit my characters at all. So, after spending a week working on it, I tossed it out the window. Then, I started anew.

Talk about frustrating!

So, what is everyone else working on?

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Tuesday - Grammar Lesson (Adverbs and Adjectives)
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 28th, 2008 (08:11 pm)
Tags:

Okay, for today's lesson we're looking at adverbs and adjectives.

The simplest definition is:
Adverb: Describes a verb.
Adjective: Describes a noun.

The following article describes two of the most common mis-uses of adverbs and adjectives (thanks seattlecsifan for finding this):

From The Creative Writer’s Style Guide, by Christopher T. Leland 

TWO COMMON PROBLEMS:

OVERWRITING AND ABSTRACTION 

  The ease of working with modifiers may actually be the biggest problem that arises in creative work. The malignant proliferation of modifiers is probably the most common kind of overwriting. Apprentice writers, drunk with the language’s multitudinous and previously un-thought-of possibilities, tumble ecstatically into a wild intoxication in which mobs of modifiers stagger and reel wildly through sonorous sentences, leaving the poor reader straining-nay, truly stupefied!-before the armada of adverbs, the phalanxes of phrases, and columns of clauses marching without cease through paragraph after endless paragraph like marauding barbarians through conquered and abject Rome.  

  As you can see, this temptation does not afflict only beginners. 

  The goal in your writing is to be exact and colorful without clotting up your expression with needless or repetitive words. In the over inflated sentence above, you can see how, individually, the various modifiers-adjectives, adverbs, phrases, and clauses-are fine. But their cumulative effect is overwhelming and unintentionally comic. When you reread something you have written, take note as to whether every noun has its adjective, every verb has its adverb, and so on. If so, you’re trying too hard or choosing nouns and verbs that are not as specific and striking as they should be. 

  An opposite but equally significant problem can arise when modifiers are too few or too abstract or uninteresting. Simply telling your reader that “Carrie was beautiful” doesn’t say much. How beautiful? In that busty and full-figured way of the forties and fifties, like Jane Russell or Marilyn Monroe? Like the icons of the latter part of the Twentieth Century: slim and even slightly androgynous? Is Carrie’s a classic or exotic beauty? Is her beauty physical or spiritual? What specifically do you want your audience to envision? 

  The solution to this problem is not a “wanted poster” description: “Carrie was five foot two, weighed one hundred and two pounds, had brown hair and green eyes, a good figure, and pretty legs.” The inadequacy of such a passage is threefold. First, for someone not trained in law enforcement, precise heights and weights are largely pointless. Can you really visualize the difference between a woman who is five-two and one who is five-four? One who weighs one hundred ten pounds vs. one who weighs ninety-eight pounds? Second, vague modifiers clutter, not enhance, a description. What constitutes a “good” figure or “pretty” legs? Beyond these issues, all this description is delivered in one fell swoop, which neither produces the impact of a description more fully integrated into the text nor reflects how we perceive people when we first meet them in real life. 

  Revealing characteristics of a person-both the physical self and the personality-more gradually is a useful, effective technique. Additionally, give the readers a sense of what a character looks like via details that tell something distinctive and easily perceptible about a character. 

  Rob had always found Carrie beautiful, from the very first time they met. Initially, it was those sea green eyes, somehow astonishing against her complexion the color of caffe latte. That, and the way she moved. She had the supple grace of a cat-not a house cat, but something like a cheetah, some swift and long-limbed wild thing that demanded both admiration and respect. 

  You can see how the writer gives some very specific details but allows us readers to construct Carrie on our own. We don’t know how much Carrie weighs, how tall she is, or what her breasts or behind is like. We know that Rob finds her attractive, but one of the wonderful things about prose as apposed to film is that it is up to the reader to “make” a character, and my vision of what Carrie looks like may be very different form yours. However, if this story gets made into a movie starring Halle Berry, that’s who we both will see when we think of Carrie. Prose involves a kind of collusion between you and your reader that the visual media can never imitate.

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Monday - Prompts and Other Fun Stuff
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 27th, 2008 (07:17 pm)
Tags:

Okay, I realize I'm running a little late. You'd think that if I wrote this stuff the day before, I'd remember to click the button and actually post something. Not me. Anyway, on to the good stuff.

Prompts:
Quote: Use "What's your sign?" in a story someplace.
Word: pumpkins

You can use one or both. Just have fun with it.

insolentscrawl [userpic]
Friday - Concrit Day
by insolentscrawl (insolentscrawl)
at October 27th, 2008 (07:14 pm)
Tags:

Okay, it's concrit day! Need some constructive criticism? Hit reply and leave a link.

< back | 0 - 10 |